Berkswell Cheese Hard Cheese Sheep's Cheese

The Ultimate Guide to Berkswell Cheese

By Claragh Nugent

Apr 1, 2022

The Ultimate Guide to Berkswell Cheese

When it comes to Berkswell cheese, one thing is for sure…it looks like a UFO. It tastes pretty out of this world too (we're here all week folks). Its distinct look is all thanks to the fact that the curds are drained in kitchen colanders! 

With a deep, nutty flavour it magically manages to offer a little bit of fruity sweetness too. Whilst similar in style to a Manchego, it carries a huge amount of individual character that will definitely add some extra interest to your cheeseboard.

Here, we’ve got all the info you need about the award-winning Berkswell cheese, including its interesting history and what drinks pair with it perfectly. 

Berkswell Cheese History:

The very first Berkswell cheese was made in the early 1990s at Ram Hall Farm in the picturesque village of Berkswell in Warwickshire. The farm has been owned by the Fletcher family for 6 generations, with these legends clearly mastering the art of cheesemaking in that time. 

What started out as a farm with 40 East Friesland ewes has now flourished and expanded to an 850+ strong flock. Even today, the cheese is made with milk sourced entirely from the sheep at Ram Hall Farm. All the ewes have been born and bred at the farm, then divided into 4 flocks and lambing consistently to provide a steady flow of milk. This means that Berkswell cheese can be produced all year round.

What you Need to Know About Berkswell Cheese:

Want to serve some yummy Berkswell cheese at your next get-together? Here are some key headlines:

  • Type of cheese - Berkswell is a hard cheese with a firm and dense texture that’s perfect for grating over meals.
  • Milk - it's made from unpasteurised sheep’s milk.
  • Strength - it scores a 7 out of 10 on the strength scale, so it’s a little on the strong side for casual cheese eaters, but still, one everyone should try.
  • Hardness - on the hardness scale, it scores a 9 out of 10, which means you definitely don’t want to try spreading it! 
  • Region - this cheese is from the West Midlands. 
  • Vegetarian - Berkswell is not suitable for vegetarians. 

Berkswell Cheese Wine Pairings:

Berkswell cheese and white wine go hand in hand. ( Just like us and cheese), however it also works beautifully with a fruitier red wine (Beaujolais for example). Our favourite wine to pair with Berkswell cheese though is Distant Noises Chardonnay with its fruity, citrus notes and subtle hints of spice to balance out the savoury cheese.

Berkswell Cheese Accompaniments:

When it comes to food, there’s plenty that pairs well with Berkswell. We love it with Peter's Yard Original Crackers and some Rambunctious Red Onion & Port dolloped on top. It’s beyond delicious! It’s also ideal to eat with apple chutney, honey, ham and sourdough bread. 

Can I Eat the Rind of Berkswell Cheese?

If you’re the type of person who laughs in the face of danger, then sure, eat the rind. In all seriousness though, the rind is extremely strong, thick, chewy and brown-red in colour. Even us cheesegeeks prefer to leave it behind ( as tough as leaving any sort of cheese behind is) 

How to Store Berkswell Cheese:

This cheese is best stored in a cool place rather than a cold fridge. If you’re lucky enough to live in a house with a pantry, now is your time to shine! Try and avoid wrapping in clingfilm, the last thing we want is sweaty cheese! Try and use greaseproof or wax paper instead. If you have no other option but to put it in the fridge, don’t worry too much. It’s perfectly fine to do that. Just place it in the salad drawer and bring it to room temperature before eating, so you get to enjoy it at its most flavoursome.


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